What is the Social Service Tribe?

I was walking home one night when I saw this poster at the bus stop. I wouldn’t have stopped to take a photo of the poster if not for the word “tribe”, which caught my attention. (Yes I do have a fascination with hidden tribes and traditions.)

It seems that this Social Service Tribe organisation was created as a platform to inspire Singaporeans to choose social service as a career of choice. It’s of course supported by the National Council of Social Service, or NCSS in short.¬†

 

Whether you are a student or a mid-career professional, do check out Social Service Tribe’s website to get your hands on career guides, write-ups on the range of professions available in social service, as well as how you can acquire the right skills to get there.

The website also provides you with links to training and development schemes such as the Sun Ray Scheme, Professional Conversion Programmes, as well as Internships.

No matter where your passion lies, Social Service Tribe believes you can make a meaningful impact on the community.

Check out their website at this link, and follow these great people on Facebook!

Where to Bring Mum: Jamie’s Italian Restaurant @ Forum Orchard

We entered the Jamie’s Italian restaurant really late, like 30 minutes before closing time. Unfortunately for us, it wasn’t good news for us. The air-con was turned off I think towards closing time, and we were still eating. It was so stuffy. ūüė¶

We ordered Jamie Italian’s Squid Ink Pasta, which turned out well. It was packed full of the usual seafood flavours, mussels, squid etc. We shared the pasta among the four of us. Unfortunately all I remember of that day was the stuffy environment, but I won’t harp on that further. Sorry. Haha.

Then came my “The Parma” pizza! Probably what I was look forward to the most. Topped with tomato sauce and beautiful mozzarella, and the lovely prosciutto ham, as well as rocket & parmesan. It was $28.95 but looking back, they could have been more generous on the parma ham.

 

Here are close-ups on the squid ink pasta. Indeed it was yummy. ūüôā

We also ordered Spice Fries, which was Gennaro‚Äôs chilli rub at $7.95. Unfortunately, we’ve tried the Jamie’s Italian in Edinburgh, and this one in Singapore doesn’t come close.

All in all, I’m not exactly a fan of this Jamie’s Italian, but if I do come back, I will be sure to come way earlier!

 

 

Why are we talking about right turns?

With so many news articles on right turns out there, SGDaybook breaks it down for you.

What is a discretionary right turn?

A discretionary right turn is located at a traffic junction, and gives motorists the discretion to make a right turn when the lights are green. That “imaginary pocket” as driving instructors like to say. The driver would have to watch out for oncoming traffic and pedestrians to assess if it’s safe to make a right turn at his discretion.

Why is Singapore suddenly talking about discretionary right turns?

Unfortunately, there were two recent accidents involving discretionary right turns, and both involved a fatality each. These incidents prompted citizens to point out that discretionary right turns are dangerous, especially when 90% of accidents on the road are caused by human error such as bad judgment and being distracted.

The problem with discretionary right turn is that it places the onus on the driver to decide when to turn. He has to find a gap in the traffic, and look out for pedestrians. Depending on his state of mind, he may not be able to judge the speed of coming vehicles.

Is LTA doing anything? 

Yes, and they have already started work on this even before the two accidents. Out of 1600 junctions in Singapore, the LTA has removed the discretionary right turns in 200 junctions. LTA also plans to do so for the remaining junctions where possible in the next 5 years.

In place, they are going to introduce RAG arrows – which are Red, Amber and Green arrows. This means that motorists will not be allowed to turn right when the red arrow is lit. They would have to wait for the green arrow, and there would be no conflict with other traffic. It’s basically green light for turning right, and so drivers will have more certainty when they are turning.

Where have these RAG arrows been introduced?

These RAG arrows have been introduced at “black spots”, where many accidents take place. Since the introduction of these RAG arrows, the authorities have seen improvements in safety rates.

Were accidents totally eliminated?

Unfortunately, no. Though accident rates fell, accidents cannot be totally eliminated due to the risk of human error. For instance, motorists may want to beat the red arrow. So please drive safe!

Since discretionary right turns are dangerous, why do we have them in the first place?

From a traffic design point of view, discretionary right turns help optimise traffic flow, especially during non-peak hours. If the oncoming traffic flow is not that heavy, you won’t have to wait till it’s your turn to turn. Hence, discretionary right turns are great for off-peak hours.

If LTA were to get rid of discretionary right turns, won’t we have to wait longer at the traffic lights?

Yes, all of us will have to learn to be more patient on the roads – for a good cause though, as RAG arrows will minimise uncertainty when making a turn. Imagine being at the front of the queue at a discretionary right turn and everyone’s honking behind you. It’s pressurising! I’ve been there. Patience is a virtue. P.S.: Please resist the temptation to text your favourite group chat while waiting.

Library @ Bukit Panjang Plaza

I was exploring Bukit Panjang Plaza when I came across the Public Library on the third floor of the mall. It was beautifully furnished, with a fun and welcoming layout that’s like a little Bookworm wonderland.

On one side of the third floor was the children’s section, which comes with a really fun Willy Wonka-like bookdrop where you can see your book travelling along the conveyor belt and sorted out towards the end of the process chain.

The children’s section was also complete with little clusters of books, so low that babies and toddlers can help themselves to any book they like!

The bookshelves were interestingly shaped, and the layout begs to be explored, just that I don’t know if it’ll be easy to locate a particular book given the curved shelves.

Who says libraries have to come with straight, traditional shelves anyway? I wish I were a kid again, and I’ll keep myself occupied in these little craters!

Over at the other side of the third floor is the Adult and Teens Zones.

I love it so much that it says “Volunteer-Run Space”, and there was really a volunteer walking the ground! I’m so appreciative of these volunteers.

It’s a similar look, except the shelves were more adult-height. Haha.

A friendly sign says we can return library items round the clock! Looks like the library is open round the clock!

The layout is really pretty too. I like the little cones that are so artfully designed. Spirals, spirals everywhere.

Did I mention that there are plenty of comfy seats for you to plonk in and enjoy a good book? Man…¬†I really love this library! Can’t wait to be back to finish a book the next time I’m here!

Bukit Panjang Public Library
1 Jelebu Road
#04-16/17
Bukit Panjang Plaza
Singapore 677743

 

Malaysia Votes: General Elections 2018 Results [Updated]

Malaysia has 222 parliamentary seats in total. Unofficial¬†results of Malaysia’s general election show that the main opposition led by Mahathir Mohamad has secured 112 seats, a simple majority, which is enough to form government. He’s 92. Apparently, they won by 8,893 votes, which was announced at 11.25pm in Langkawi.

Apparently, there was a press conference due to be hosted by PM Najib at 9pm, but he has yet to show up as of 11.45pm. According to Mr Mahathir, BN is far behind.

Here are the winners by state, as of 11.58pm according to Bernama on 9 May 2018:

  • Perlis:¬†

RUZAINI BIN RAIS (BN)
MOHD RIDZUAN BIN HASHIM (PAS)
NURULHISHAM BIN YAAKOB (BN)

  • Kedah

MAHATHIR BIN MOHAMAD (PKR) — Langkawi
JUHARI BIN BULAT (PKR)
MOHD FIRDAUS BIN AHMAD (PKR)

  • Kelantan¬†

SITI ZAILAH BINTI MOHD YUSOFF (PAS)
ZURAIDIN BIN ABDULLAH (PAS)
MOHAMAD BIN AWANG (PAS)
ABDUL RASUL BIN MUHAMED (PAS)
TUAN MOHD SARIPUDIN BIN TUAN ISMAIL (PAS)
MOHD NAZLAN BIN MOHAMED HASBULLAH (PAS)
W HASSAN BIN W IBRAHIM (PAS)
MOHD RODZI BIN JA’AFAR (PAS)

  • Terengganu:¬†

MOHD NURKHUZAINI BIN AB RAHMAN (PAS)
ALIAS BIN HARUN (PAS)
HANAFIAH BIN MAT (PAS)

  • Pulau Pinang:

KHALIQ MEHTAB BIN MOHD ISHAQ (PKR)
PHEE BOON POH (PKR)
SOON LIP CHEE (PKR)
SATEES A/L MUNIANDY (PKR)
MUHAMMAD FAIZ BIN FADZIL (PKR)
CHOW KON YEOW (PKR)
GOOI ZI SEN (PKR)
TEH LAI HENG (PKR)

  • Perak:

CHEAH POU HIAN (PKR)
MOHD NIZAR BIN ZAKARIA (BN)
KHAIRUDIN BIN ABU HANIPAH (BN)
KHAIRUL SHAHRIL BIN MOHAMED (BN)
SHAHRUL ZAMAN BIN YAHYA (BN)
KHAIRUDDIN BIN TARMIZI (BN)

  • Pahang:

ISMAIL BIN ABD. MUTTALIB (BN)
MOHD SOFIAN BIN ABD JALIL (PAS)
SHAHANIZA BT SHAMSUDDIN (BN)
MUJIBUR RAHMAN BIN ISHAK (PAS)
ISMAIL BIN MOHAMED SAID (BN)
MOHAMED BIN JAAFAR (BN)
SYED IBRAHIM BIN SYED AHMAD (BN)
SHAHRIL AZMAN BIN ABD HALIM (PAS)
RAZALI BIN KASSIM (BN)

  • Selangor:

MOHAMED AZMIN BIN ALI (PKR)
HANIZA BINTI MOHAMED TALHA (PKR)
EAN YONG HIAN WAH (PKR)
SITI MARIAH BINTI MAHMUD (PKR)

  • Kuala Lumpur:

LIM LIP ENG (PKR)
PRABAKARAN A/L M PARAMESWARAN (BEBAS)
FONG KUI LUN (PKR)
TERESA KOK SUH SIM (PKR)

  • Putrajaya:¬†

TENGKU ADNAN BIN TENGKU MANSOR (BN)

  • Negeri Sembilan¬†

LOKE SIEW FOOK (PKR)
NOOR AZMI BIN YUSOF (BN)
BAKRI BIN SAWIR (PKR)
NG CHIN TSAI (PKR)
MOHAMAD NAZARUDDIN BIN SABTU (PKR)
ZAIFULBAHRI BIN IDRIS (BN)
MOHAMAD BIN HAJI HASAN (BN)
HASAN BIN BAHROM (PKR)
ABD.RAZAK BIN AB.SAID (BN)
MOHD ISAM BIN MOHD ISA (BN)
VEERAPAN A/L SUPERAMANIAM (PKR)

  • Melaka¬†

ISMAIL BIN OTHMAN (BN)
MD RAWI BIN MAHMUD (BN)

  • Johor¬†

ZULKURNAIN BIN KAMISAN (BN)
HALIMAH BINTI MOHD SADIQUE (BN)
RASMAN BIN ITHNAIN (BN)
ROSLELI BIN JAHARI (BN)
AZALINA BINTI OTHMAN (BN)
SHARIFAH AZIZAH BINTI SYED ZAIN (BN)
SYED SIS BIN A RAHMAN (BN)

  • Labuan¬†

ROZMAN BIN ISLI (BN)

  • Sabah

MASIDI BIN MANJUN @ MASDI (BN)
GAPARI BIN KATINGAN @ GEOFFREY KITINGAN (SOLIDARITI)
ROBERT TAWIK @ NORDIN (SOLIDARITI)
RASININ BIN KOUTIS @ KAUTIS (WARISAN)
WONG TIEN FATT @ WONG NYUK FOH (DAP)
CHONG KET KIUN (DAP)
POON MING FUNG (DAP)
DATUK NIZAM BIN DATUK ABU BAKAR TITINGAN (BN)
WONG SZE PHIN @ JIMMY (DAP)

  • Sarawak¬†

MORDI ANAK BIMOL (DAP)
WAN JUNAIDI BIN TUANKU JAAFAR (BN)
FADILLAH BIN YUSOF (BN)
KELVIN YII LEE WUEN (DAP)
CHONG CHIENG JEN (DAP)
RUBIAH BINTI WANG (BN)
WILLIE ANAK MONGIN (PKR)
RICHARD RIOT ANAK JAEM (BN)
NANCY BINTI SHUKRI (BN)
ROHANI BINTI ABDUL KARIM (BN)
MASIR ANAK KUJAT (BN)
TAMBAT @ JUGAH AK MUYANG (BEBAS)
ROBERT LAWSON CHUAT (BN)
ALI ANAK BIJU (PKR)
YUSUF BIN ABD WAHAB (BN)
AHMAD JOHNIE BIN ZAWAWI (BN)
WONG LING BIU (DAP)
LARRY SOON @ LARRY SNG WEI SHIEN (BEBAS)
AGO ANAK DAGANG (BN)
ALICE LAU KIONG YIENG (DAP)
OSCAR LING CHAI YEW (DAP)
HANIFAH HAJAR TAIB (BN)
BARU BIAN (PKR)
ALEXANDER NANTA LINGGI (BN)
UGAK ANAK KUMBONG (BN)
TIONG KING SING (BN)
LUKANISMAN BIN AWANG SAUNI (BN)
MICHAEL TEO YU KENG (PKR)
HASBI BIN HABIBOLLAH (BN)
HENRY SUM AGONG (BN)

For official results, refer to Malaysiakini.

Who are Malaysia’s voters? [Voter Demographics]

Malaysia took to the polls today, 9 May 2018. Voting closed at 5pm.

If you are wondering what are the demographics of Malaysia’s voters, here are a few statistics for you.

1.      Age Groups

41% of registered voters are in the 21 to 39 age group, 39% of voters are in the 40 to 59 age groups, and 18% of voters are in the 60 to 79 age group. I’m amazed that there were Malaysians above 80 years of age who took the trouble to go to the polls.

2.    Bigger Proportion of Young Voters

This time round, the youngest age group increased by a whopping 10%. In 2013, 30% of voters were in the 21 to 39 age bracket. This year, this age group formed a larger proportion of voters at 40%.

3.    Unregistered Voters

Out of 18.7 million eligible voters in Malaysia, 3.8 million did not register for voting. Out of the 3.8 million unregistered voters, a majority was in the 21 to 30 age group. Growing apathy, perhaps?

Map Locations of Stations of the Jurong Region Line

After years of planning, LTA has released the locations of the 24 stations of the Jurong Region Line.

JS 1 – Choa Chu Kang

This map presents an extension of the existing CCK MRT station, as well as a new bus interchange that connects to the Lot One area.

1

JS2 – Choa Chu Kang West

This MRT station is located diagonally across from Sunshine Place. Awesome, because this area is in serious need of a train station. People have been relying on the feeder service to take them to CCK MRT.

2

TENGAH

3

JS5 – Corporation

This station is located right next to Jurong Junior College. It’s hurray for people in Boon Lay. Students can get home easily. Oh, and Google’s employees too.

4

JS6 – Jurong West

I can’t believe Jurong West finally has its own station. Congratulations, folks! This ones right outside St Joseph’s Home and Singapore Boys’ Home.

5

JS7 – Bahar Junction

Bahar Junction makes it easier for Boon Lay Secondary and Westwood Primary students to get to school. Great location!

6

JS8 – Boon Lay

Boon Lay Station is set to expand! Jurong Point Extension 3, perhaps?

7

JS9 – Enterprise

Best name of all. Enterprise Station. Walking distance from Safra Jurong, and serves a bunch of industrial companies too.

8

JS10 – Tukang

Tukang brings you deeper into Jurong Industrial Estate. It’s right outside the JTC MedTech Hub and the iconic Caterpillar building.

9

JS11 – Jurong Hill

Jurong Hill is right next to Jurong Hill Park, and walking distance to Jurong Bird Park. But the Bird Park’s gonna fly to Mandai. So yeah, whatever’s going to happen here, it’s going to be great!

10

JS12 – Jurong Pier

Our Jurong Island friends are probably partying the night away by now. A train station right outside the Jurong Island checkpoint! Makes life so much easier!

11

TENGAH

12

JE2 – Tengah Park

Tengah Park Station is right outside Dulwich College, a beautiful English-looking school. There are plenty of upcoming developments in the area, so it’s a pleasant surprise for residents-to-be.

13

JE3 – Bukit Batok West

This station is located at the entrance of PIE. Serves the happy residents living on the edge of Jurong.

14

JE4 – Toh Guan

Toh Guan Station is nestled in a tranquil Jurong neighbourhood.

15

JE5 – Jurong East

As if it isn’t crazy enough, all these means Jurong East has to further expand!

16

JE6 – Jurong Town Hall

It’s smiles all around for employees at the International Business Park!

17

JE7 – Pandan Reservoir

To visit the reservoir, you no longer have to take a bus. But this station serves a neighbourhood with few amenities. Ayer Rajah residents will just be a “hop away” from Jurong, as Foo Mee Har says. But don’t stop at the connectivity – more supermarkets, shops and food centres, please!

18

JW1 – Gek Poh

Wow, looks like Westwood Primary students have two MRT stations to choose from!

19

JW2 – Tawas

Tawas serves JTC’s CleanTech Park, a green business park dedicated to growing sustainable and innovative industries. Lovely Jurong Eco-Garden in the heart of the park as well.

20

JW3 – Nanyang Gateway

Nanyang Gateway brings you to the halls and residents of NTU. No more waiting for…

179?21

JW4 – Nanyang Crescent

Teachers-to-be at NIE will have something to look forward to!

22

JW5 – Peng Kang Hill

Perfect for NTU students rushing to class. Or rushing home!

23

Wait a minute… for the last one – did they mean barbeque? Lol.